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Information and Resources

Meet the Birds

Western Tanager

Although Western Tanagers (Piranga ludoviciana) are brilliantly colored and nest across much of the western United States and Canada, they can be hard to see most of the time. They nest in mountain forests and tend to stay hidden in the shade. During spring migration, however, these colorful birds become a common sight in yards, parks, and bird baths throughout the Willamette Valley. Read more...

Red-breasted Nuthatch

A favorite backyard bird is a small (4-1/2") bird with a distinctive shape -- compact and tapered at both ends! Read more...

Warblers

Among the most beautiful birds in the Western Hemisphere are the wood warblers. These tiny birds appear in a dazzling array of yellows, blues, greens, reds, and grays Read more...

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is one of the most striking birds observed in our backyards. Read more...

Rufous Hummingbird

In March we welcome Rufous Hummingbirds, who fly up to 3,000 miles from their wintering grounds to join us in the northwest. Read more...

Violet-green Swallow

Many backyard bird watchers agree that spring really begins when the swallows return! A northwestern favorite is the Violet-green Swallow, a summer resident that can be coaxed to nest in our backyards. Read more...

Evening Grosbeak

If your black oil sunflower seeds are vanishing at an alarming rate, and your feeders seem especially crowded and noisy, the “grocery beaks” may be paying you a visit! If you have the honor of hosting them this year, you're lucky -- our population of Evening Grosbeaks has declined 78% in the last 40 years. Read more...

The Grosbeaks

A sure sign of spring in the Willamette Valley is the arrival of the Grosbeaks. The new season brings us two species - the Black-headed Grosbeak arrives in May from its Mexican wintering grounds and the Evening Grosbeak invades our cities from southern Oregon and California. Despite differing habitat preferences, both species are possible in your backyard and are attracted to a feeder filled with Black Oil Sunflower seeds Read more...

Finch Family

While they all readily gobble up black oil sunflower seeds, the smaller finches also enjoy having their own feeder stocked with Nyjer seeds. Finches tend to be nomadic, so you may see many birds one week and few birds the next. Read more...

Townsend’s Warbler – an Exciting Winter Visitor

It's a dreary winter day, a few juncos hop around the millet tray while House Finches and chickadees work on the black oil sunflower feeder. Suddenly a flash of color zooms down to the suet feeder. What's that bird with the striking black and yellow face? Why, it's a Townsend's Warbler! Read more...

Varied Thrush

A visit from a Varied Thrush can brighten up a drab winter day. This striking bird may remind you of its cousin, the American Robin, only dressed in orange instead of red. Read more...

Bushtits

Those aren’t locusts swarming your suet feeder – they’re Bushtits! Read more...

Pine Siskin

Pine Siskins will delight you all winter long with their aggressive and acrobatic antics in your backyard and at your feeder. This common winter bird has a bright yellow bar on each wing and at the base of the tail that will help you distinguish it from many of its finch relatives. The rest of its body is streaked brown. Read more...

Canada Goose

Canada Geese are eye- and ear-catching birds that have captured the imagination of Americans for hundreds of years. Living symbols of the changing seasons, they are a source of wonder and speculation even today. Read more...

Cowbird

You know how it is. Once someone gets a bad reputation, they’re deemed responsible for all kinds of mischief, deservedly or not. So it is with cowbirds, who leave the care of their young (from eggs to adulthood) to other species. The unlucky foster parents are often warblers, sparrows or finches. Read more...

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