Plant a Bee Garden and Welcome a Host of Native Wildlife

To attract many of our native bees, start by planting bee- attracting plants. You’ll get a bonus from doing so: an array of other wildlife will be attracted as well! The native bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, flies and other pollinators you attract will give your garden a bountiful harvest of fruits, vegetables, seeds as they provide hours of outdoor entertainment.

Did you know that there are nearly 5,000 species of native (“wild”) bees in the U.S. ?  Most of these native bees do not sting, but rather simply live their lives in search of pollen and nectar to feed themselves and their young.  To attract many of our native bees, start by planting bee- attracting plants.

Then, be sure your yard or garden is pesticide-free.  You’ll get a bonus from doing so:  an array of other wildlife will be attracted as well!  The native bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, flies and other pollinators you attract will give your garden a bountiful harvest of fruits, vegetables, seeds as they provide hours of outdoor entertainment.  Here’s a list of bee plants to help build a backyard native bee habitat:

FULL SUN:

Yarrow
Anise hyssop
Juneberry
Korean angelica
Golden marguerite
Snapdragon
Columbine
Goatsbeard
Butterfly weed
Gold dust
New England aster
Japanese barberry
False indigo
Bluebird
California lilac
Cosmos
Crocus
Coneflower
English wallflower
California poppy
Sunflower
Heliotrope
Hyssop
Lavender
Liatris
Night scented stock
Evening Primrose
Oriental Poppy
Firethorne
Currant
Rosemary
Blackeyed Susan
Sage
Golden Rod
Thyme
Mullein
Verbena

PART SUN:

Bugleweed
Pot Marigold
Red valerian
Flowering quince
Golden clematis
Coreopsis
Dogwood
Cotoneaster
Giant sea kale
Sweet William
Foxglove
Teasel
Globe thistle
Elaeagnus
Joe Pye weed
Meadowsweet
Holly
White gaura
Sweetpea
Cardinal Flower
Honeysuckle
Ragged Robin Lychris
Oregon Grape
Crabapple
Bee Balm
Nicotiana
Oregano
Cowslip
Rose
Sedum
Mt. Ash
Nasturtium
Blueberry
Virburnum
Pansy

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